Coenzyme Q10 therapeutic applications

Evidence from randomized controlled trials like the Q-Symbio study show the efficacy of Coenzyme Q10 adjuvant treatment in improving the symptoms and survival of chronic heart failure patients. Illustration courtesy of Dr. William Judy, SIBR Research Institute.

For 30-plus years now, bio-medical researchers have investigated and documented the functions of Coenzyme Q10 in the human body:

  • An essential role in cellular production of ATP energy [Littarru 2007]
  • An important antioxidant role preventing the oxidation of proteins, lipids, and DNA [Littarru 2007]
  • A role in the enhancement of endothelial function [Littarru 2011]
  • A beneficial role in the expression of genes involved in human cell metabolism, signaling, and transport [Garrido-Maraver]

Moreover, the scientific documentation shows that Coenzyme Q10 supplements are safe, are well-tolerated, and are effective as adjunctive treatments in diseases involving high cellular and tissue demands for energy and in diseases involving oxidative stress and oxidative damage [Garrido-Maraver].

Absorption and Bio-Availability of Coenzyme Q10

As we get older, our bodies produce less Coenzyme Q10 [Kalén].  It is not realistic to make up the difference in the diet [Judy].  Supplementation is necessary.

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Dr. Judy’s Coenzyme Q10 research history

When the ubiquinol supplement enters the stomach and when the capsule opens, the ubiquinol begins to oxidize. In the small intestine, the ubiquinol is converted to almost all ubiquinone. In the absorption cells and in the abdominal lymph ducts, the Coenzyme Q10 is initially almost all in the ubiquinone form. The Coenzyme Q10 enters the blood from the lymph. Thus, it appears that ubiquinol is absorbed as ubiquinone and not as ubiquinol. It is then converted back to ubiquinol before entering the blood. From: Dr. Judy’s presentation at the International Coenzyme Q10 Association symposium in Bologna, Italy, October, 2015.

Q. Good morning, Dr. Judy.  Let’s talk about the Coenzyme Q10 research you have done in your career.  But, first, do you remember when you first met Dr. Karl Folkers, the grand old man of Coenzyme Q10 research?

A. Good morning.  Yes, I met Dr. Folkers in 1968.  He had just started the Institute for Bio-Medical Research at UT in Austin.  He came to talk to Dr. Les Geddes and Dr. Lee Baker in the Physiology and Biophysics Department at Baylor University Medical School in Houston, Texas.  He talked to them about the bio-electrical impedance method for non-invasively measuring cardiac function in heart failure patients.

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Coenzyme Q10 Absorption Q & A with Dr. Judy

Long-time Coenzyme Q10 researchers and colleagues of Dr. Judy: Dr. Karl Folkers (left) and Dr. Svend Aage Mortensen, the lead researcher on the Q-Symbio study.

Q.  Good morning, Dr. Judy.  Thank you for taking some time for q10facts.com.  Last time we talked about the safety of Coenzyme Q10.  What about the absorption and bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10?  That has been a special area of research for you at the SIBR Research Institute, I think.

A.  Good morning.  Yes, you are correct.  I have been involved in several clinical studies of the efficacy of Coenzyme Q10 supplementation, but my big interest for the past 20 years has been in testing the absorption and bioavailability of the various Coenzyme Q10 supplements.  Maybe I should start by distinguishing between absorption studies and bioavailability studies.

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