Absorption of Coenzyme Q10, part I

steak
Once we pass the age of 20, our bodies begin to produce less Coenzyme Q10 with increasing age. Various medications, including statin medications, interfere with our production of Coenzyme Q10. Most of us cannot hope to make up the difference in our meals. For good heart health, we need a daily Coenzyme Q10 supplement. The ubiquinone form of supplement is the most stable form and the most carefully researched form.

Coenzyme Q10 is a vitamin-like substance that is an essential bio-nutrient.  It is vital for the cellular process of ATP energy production. It is an important antioxidant protecting the cells against harmful free radicals. It is thought to improve epithelial cell function in the blood vessels and to protect against the development of atherosclerosis and high blood pressure. In this essay, we review some of  the basic facts of Coenzyme Q10 absorption and bio-availability.

Importance of Coenzyme Q10 absorption
Coenzyme Q10 bio-synthesis declines with age
Our bodies produce Coenzyme Q10 in much the same way that they produce cholesterol.  However, once we reach our 20’s, our bio-synthesis of Coenzyme Q10 begins to decline with increasing age [Kalén].  One estimate is that the plasma Coenzyme Q10 concentration of an average 65-year-old will be only about half the plasma concentration of an average 25-year-old: approximately 0.65 micrograms per milliliter versus 1.35 micrograms per milliliter.

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Coenzyme Q10: the best of q10facts.com — part II

emergency-room
Daily supplementation with 200 milligrams of Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to reduce the number of hospitalizations and re-hospitalizations of chronic heart failure patients. The use of Coenzyme Q10 as an adjuvant treatment improves the quality of life for patients and reduces the expenses of health care systems.

Last month, I wrote brief summaries of some of the best articles that have been published on this website.  This month, I want to present summaries of several more good q10facts.com articles about the health benefits of Coenzyme Q10 supplementation.  The information in all of these articles is based on clinical study results published in peer-reviewed bio-medical journals.  In each summary, there is a link to the original article.

Fewer hospitalizations with Coenzyme Q10
In the Q-Symbio study, 420 chronic heart failure patients on conventional heart failure medications were randomly assigned to an adjuvant Coenzyme Q10 treatment group (n=202) or to a placebo control group (n=218).  In the study, Dr. Svend Aage Mortensen and his fellow researchers wanted to test the hypothesis that the condition of the energy-starved heart could be improved by the use of Coenzyme Q10 supplementation.

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Coenzyme Q10 and selenium: partners against heart disease

Surgeons and hospitalized patient
Swedish seniors, both men and women, who took Q10 and selenium supplements for a 4-year period spent 13% fewer days in the hospital and had significantly better quality of life than did Swedish seniors who took placebos.

There is a tantalizingly interesting relationship between the essential bio-nutrient Coenzyme Q10 and the trace element selenium and heart disease.  One of the first clinical researchers to tease out the effects of supplementation with Q10 and selenium in heart attack patients was Dr. Bodo Kuklinski.  

Coenzyme Q10 and selenium for heart attack patients
Dr. Kuklinski tested 61 patients who had been admitted to the hospital in Rostock, Germany, with an acute myocardial infarction and with symptoms of less than six hours’ duration.  He assigned 32 of the patients to the adjuvant treatment group and 29 of the patients to the control group.

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Strange TV ad for Q10 Ubiquinol product

Pro football picture
TV commercials reach many people. It is just not possible to do justice to the ubiquinone-ubiquinol Q10 controversy in a 30-second TV commercial. The topic is a bit more complicated than that.

Commercial spots on prime time television must be expensive, right?  Can we agree that the information in television commercials should be accurate?  Is the Federal Communications Commission doing what it should be doing to protect consumers against misleading television commercials?  Sometimes, it seems that consumers are being misled by the advertising of Q10 products.

Dr. William Judy, long-time Coenzyme Q10 researcher and Chairman and founder of SIBR Research, told me that, one evening recently, his wife called to him while he was watching an Indianapolis Colts game in his home office.  Mrs. Judy wanted him to come see a commercial running during the showing of a film on television.

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