Coenzyme Q10 for People Over 65 Years of Age

Sufficient intakes of Coenzyme Q10 are increasingly important as we age. Our bodies synthesize less and less Coenzyme Q10 as we progress from middle age to our senior years. One estimate is that the CoQ10 status of an 80-year-old man’s heart muscle cells will be about half of what is normal in a 20-year-old man [Alehagen 2015].

Guillermo Lopez-Lluch
Prof. Guillermo Lopez-Lluch says that older people who have more symptoms of fragility also have lower concentrations of Coenzyme Q10 their blood plasma. The study data show that this relationship is more common in women than in men.

Sub-optimal levels of Coenzyme Q10 are associated with ageing, energy insufficiency, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease [Why Humans 2022].

read more

Combined Coenzyme Q10 and Selenium Supplementation

There is a special biological interrelationship between Coenzyme Q10 and selenium. From a cardiologist’s perspective, there is a theoretical advantage in using both substances to prevent heart disease if the patients’ intakes are sub-optimal [Alehagen & Aaseth 2015a].

Heart chambers
Four years of daily supplementation of senior citizens with a combination of Coenzyme Q10 and selenium resulted in reduced risk of death from heart disease and in improved heart function.

This advantage has been demonstrated in the outcomes of the KiSel-10 Study, a randomized controlled trial that enrolled elderly community dwelling Swedish citizens, average age 78 years, with known low serum selenium status (mean: 67.1 mcg/L) [Alehagen 2013; Alehagen 2016a; Alehagen 2016b].

read more